• Scott - Voodoo NTN Telemark Boot - null
    Scott - Voodoo NTN Telemark Boot - Detail
    Scott - Voodoo NTN Telemark Boot - Liner
  • Scott - Voodoo NTN Telemark Boot - null
  • Scott - Voodoo NTN Telemark Boot - Detail
  • Scott - Voodoo NTN Telemark Boot - Liner
Scott - Voodoo NTN Telemark BootView Larger Image

Scott Voodoo NTN Telemark Boot

Temporarily Out Of Stock

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Tech Specs

Shell Material:
Pebax
Flex:
130
Last Width:
100 mm
Buckles:
3
Buckle Material:
aluminum
Lean Angle:
13 deg
Walk Mode:
yes, 46-degree rotation
Liner:
PWR Tour
Thermo-moldable Liner:
yes
Liner Closure:
power strap
Binding Compatibility:
NTN
Claimed Weight:
[size 27.5] 4 lb
Recommended Use:
telemark, touring
Manufacturer Warranty:
2 year limited

The perfect shoes for your dream job.

You've always wanted to a be a fighter pilot, a professional wrestler, and a rodeo rider, but guess what? Pilots, wrestlers, and cowpokes all want to be skiers; after all, it's the only way they can wear the Scott Voodoo NTN Men's Telemark Boot, which is way better than cowboy boots, knee-high leathers, and whatever shoes pilots wear to stomp on the plane's gas pedal, which is probably how planes work.

With a burly mountain-man flex of 130, powerful high overlap construction, and an adjustable spoiler, you can ski the Voodoo as hard as you want without powering through the front and ending up with your nose resting on your ski. It has a 13-degree lean angle and an asymmetrical bellows design for the proper flex, and Scott also used four separate injections to create the lower shell, making a boot that's laterally stiff so you can power through turns without tipping over or twisting on top of your ski.

Although it's designed for hard chargers, the Voodoo is as capable of racing up a line as it is maching down one, with a ski/walk switch that provides 46 degrees of cuff rotation (more than Scott's burliest alpine touring boot, if you want to brag to your friends), and a fully moldable PWR Tour liner with a stiff Pebax-reinforced tongue that hugs your foot when you're on the way or down. Throw in some micro-adjustable Ergal buckles that won't re-latch themselves after you've unbuckled, and you'll leave all your alpine friends at the lodge while you're still down for another lap.

  • Hard-charging boot for the resort or backcountry
  • Very stiff 130 flex for advanced to expert knee-droppers
  • Medium 100mm last offers versatile comfort
  • NTN binding compatibility
  • Powertour shell with stiff Pebax inserts
  • Thermo-moldable PWR Telemark High liner
  • Hike mode with 45-degree cuff rotation
  • Reviews
  • Q & A

My favorite boot

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Background: I was a PSIA ski instructor in the Eastern USA for years, skiing 2–4 times a week all season long. I've had access to and skied on many kinds of tele boots, including the old school leather 75mm style—learned on those. I am an aggressive, lean, 135lb skier with a smaller foot on a narrow side (but not straight like a board). These are my favorite boots, hands down. (I am still using the Garmont Prophet).

The flex is consistent throughout the bend and is enough let really you ski at speed. I never felt that I needed more. It's also not prohibitive when moving more slowly with less inertia. I had more than one experience with Crispis (those that had been around at the time the Prophet came out) where the flex at a certain point would give out, or the bellows would crush my foot when totally compressed. You also can use these in an alpine set-up. But the forward flex is far too soft for aggressive skiing. I would often switch into alpine skis during the day to teach alpine lessons. My favorite ski with these boot is the BD Stigma (now discontinued) that have a wood core and springy camber. So they don't need to be driven hard to bit really well into ice. They skis are by no means flat and wide skis with little camber, but not a pair of alpine racers either that would require a stiff boot. (But we all know stiff in tele is not the same flex rating as alpine boots anyway.) You can carve backwards no problem, for what that comment's worth.

About walk/touring mode: the boot does allow you stand straight up. In fact, you can even have your toe pointed down; think pointy ballerina feet, though not that dramatic. But, because the boot is stiffer, you can't do it just by flexing the foot down. You actually have stand in the boot, put it in walk mode, and lean/force it back once. Then, when you walk, it's almost like wear a normal pair shows because of the natural flex. In any event, its plenty comfortable and allows for a large range of motion. The walking is almost entirely natural, though still a bit stiff compared to other teles. The sole also has nice tread, is aggressive and grippy, especially compared to AT boots.
The other reviewers have some good observations.

Good boot that needs updating

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Pros:

-Great forward lean,

-higher cuff/spoiler better for a tall skinny guy,

-replaceable second heel,

-colours kinda cool.

-good beginner/rental boot



Cons:

-Medium/soft bellow flex,

-no crease buckle meant I got a fair amount of heel lift,

-does not have tech heel as advertised (at least on more recently produced boots and the pair I received),

-narrow width boot,

-velcro power strap wears out quickly/ineffective,

-stock liners are very soft and comfortable however do not perform well. I quickly replaced with intuition liners,

- area around the toe tech inserts wear away quickly/plastic frays.

-ski/walk switch is sharp/prominent and cuts through ski pants

-walk range of movement was a little limiting backwards

Good boot that needs updating
Unanswered Question

What is the product year of the Voodoos you are selling? I ask because my understanding is that the 2018 model does not have the Tech Heel as shown in photo.

Scott Voodoo used to be Garmont Prophet

    Couldn't get a size that fits me even though a friend says these are the most comfortable boots she's ever had and is glad she replaced her T1s. But on me the size that fit my toes was too big in the ankle and instep volume. The size that a snugged down the instep and felt right everywhere else was too tight in the front and side of the toe. I like a performance fit but this was too tight and too much pain, either that or too big for the heel and everywhere else. I have a low volume pretty ordinary foot and usually can wear most any boot in my size. This is the first time I've had a boot I can't get the right fit in any size.
    Be aware this boot has strong forward lean that does not straighten up even in walk mode. In fact, I couldn't feel any difference in shaft angle in walk mode. If you look closely, the shaft pivot is higher and to the rear compared to the Scarpa cuff pivot location, so no surprise pivoting has less effect on the shaft angle.
    These boots are decently light and all the walk mode hardware is bolt on so, if you find it doesn't help like I did, you can remove it with an allen key (and re-install it easily if you change your mind). Saves you 100g per boot because it's all steel.

    What is the last of the boot? Do these run true to size?

    Hi James, The last width on these is going to be 100mm and I would say that they run pretty true to size. If you are generally a 26.5 I would go 26.5 in these as well. Shell sizes break on the half size - 26 and 26.5 are the same shell size. If you have any other questions, please feel free to reach out to me directly.



    Matthew Pizza

    Customer Account Manager

    801.736.5363

    mpizza@backcountry.com

    Best NTN boot

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    These are the most comfortable boots I own. They are pretty stiff and also relatively lightweight. I have noticed that after skiing on them for about 80 days, the plastic in the front (where the boot goes into the toe piece of the binding) of the boot is starting to wear away- which isn't a big deal, and I've noticed that on other telemark boots too. Also, I think that the bellows in Scarpa boots flex a bit smoother- but it's also not a big deal.

    Also, the "2nd heel" (where the binding clips into the boot) broke once (I probably whacked it on something by accident), but Scott (the boot manufacturer) sent me a replacement piece right away- and it was very easy to replace- just unscrew it and put the new one on.

    Overall, I am very satisfied, and the boot is probably even better now that it has tech fittings.

    Hey Zach, can you elaborate on the comment that "the bellows in Scarpa boots flex a bit smoother?" Thanks.

    Unanswered Question

    2 questions:
    - The heel tech insert suggests I could use these with dynafiddle AT bindings, how does that work?

    -I currently ski in a Technica Zero G size 24.5, what size would that translate into in the Voodoo/Minerva?

    Award Overview

    Award Overview

    Scott Voodoo Ski Boot

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Scott's beefiest telemark boot. Unprecedented lateral stiffness works harmoniously with a smooth, progressive forward flex. 2017 Backcountry Magazine Gear Guide Select product.

    Scott Voodoo Ski Boot

    How does this compare to the Scarpa TX Pro?

    Hey DaveYo - The Voodoo's will be stiffer than the TX Pro and are more comparable to the Scarpa TX Comp in my opinion.

    Sweet. Going to be sticking with my Scarpas.

    Stiffer than the TX Pro? By how much? Demos?