NRS Large Paco Sleeping Pad

A good night's sleep down by the riverside.

There's nothing worse than sleeping on a soggy pad after an exhausting, full day of paddling. Avoid this on your next river trip with the self-inflating NRS Large Paco Sleeping Pad. A high-density urethane foam inside a welded industrial-strength PVC pouch provides ultimate sleeping comfort and durability, and it prevents moisture from collecting. The six-foot length accommodates most paddlers. You can even roll it up to use as a comfy backrest while out on the water.

  • High-density urethane foam in a welded PVC pouch
  • Self-inflating
  • Six-foot length
  • Reviews
  • Q & A

Rock sound sleeping...

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

My first experience with these was on my friends raft. I wanted one bad enough to spend the money. I was worried at first about thickness when I got this. (not as thick as my friends) My first desert trip with this was in the San Rafael Swell. We set up camp in the rockiest area I think we could find. I noticed I had placed it on a sizable rock... But when I played down to sleep it was like my bed at home. My only suggestion to anyone willing to pay slightly more is buy the next thickness up.

The only way to go on the river

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

We own a fly fishing guiding service and do extended camp trips where we will only use Paco pads for out clients. They are durable for the long haul. We don't have to worry about them getting holes or deflating on our clients. They're not about space as they don't roll up tight like a closed cell pad, but they last.

Piles of Paco

Let's go River-ing.

Piles of Paco

Thinner than I wanted

  • Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

This is Nick's wife, Lynsey:

SO I love paco pads and have slept on them on backcountry yurt trips. I bought this so camping season would be more comfortable while pregnant this summer. This 1.5" thick one doesn't give me more padding than my thermarest. I was after even more comfort and should have realized the ones usually at yurts are the thicker styles. I returned this and am sticking it out on my trusty thermarest. Note: the quality and size (length and width) is awesome just wasn't what I was looking for.

Take Me To The River.

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Ok, so these things are dangerous. The only time my raft has flipped was because I was too busy surfing the wave on my Paco Pad. Ooops.



Paco's got their origin in rafting, but having a pad that is so durable has made this my go to pad for any time I don't actually have to carry my own stuff. Throw it down by the fire, line your truck bed with them, float on it down rapids.



My one complaint, the valves on these things could be improved. But I can live with it.

Take Me To The River.

5 Star WORTHY

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The versatility and durability of the esteemed Paco Pad should never be underestimated. This is a statement I have thoroughly verified and vetted in the rigorous conditions of Mother Nature.

Once upon a time on a particularly tropical yurt trip (skiing in 65 degrees...) we learned and perfected the prestigious sport of synchronized Paco sliding. This was because one was forced to wait until noon to begin the upward climb on skis to avoid bulletproof ice - thus the free time was ample.

Not for the faint of heart, Paco sliding works best around dusk or sunrise when the snow has had a chance to refreeze and the likelihood that you reach terminal velocity is enhanced. If you want to become particularly serious, dawn is the time for speed. As the snow refreezes the surface temperature of your sliding surface will be coldest and fastest during the AM hours.

A running start is preferred and if your snow is in prime condition it will not be required to create a track. The lack of friction between the smooth surface of the Paco Pad and the bulletproof snow will render the need for a pre-established sliding track or route totally unnecessary.

The most difficult challenge will be identifying a fellow Paco Pad partner who can sync up exactly with your body moments and finesse. I considered myself extremely lucky in finding Meaghan here - she is a former CHAMPION synchronized swimmer - seriously. I don't think it would have been humanly possible for me to identify a more adept partner.

*Once you have identified your syncro partner, you hike to the top of an incline (20-27 degrees is the ideal slope).

*Countdown (in-sync) or (N'sync) with your partner from 3--2--1-- and propel your Paco Pad forward from a squatting position.

*Immediately take 3 sprinting strides and launch yourself forward into the atmosphere - Superman Style.

* Land on your Paco Pad, belly down - facing forward.

* Now is the tricky part - you must visually locate your partner while traveling at increasing speed and sync up your movements. Grace, beauty and style MUST NOT BE SACRIFICED AT ANY COST. This is very important.

* As you rapidly approach obstacles such as yurts, trees or woodpiles at terminal velocity - you must take great care not to collide with anything (including your partner) at high speed.

The wind on your face, the sound of the Paco Pad sliding atop frozen water and the joyous union of two bodies in motion is a sensation I have yet to top. It is truly indescribable.

************ WARNING *************
Only to be attempted by professionals on a closed course. This sport is very dangerous and could result in severe injury. Do not attempt without proper safety gear and training.

LMAO, everything about this is fantastic!

Alternate Use #3: CanineFlotation Device

Blow it up and float away on the blissful flow of the Colorado.

Alternate Use #3: CanineFlotation Device

Alternate Use #2: Mad Lounging

One cannot ignore the versatility of this product and its manifold applications.

Alternate Use #2: Mad Lounging

Paco Zoom

You have most likely been misled to believe that a paco pad is most typically found in a watery environment or perhaps a rudly built wooden bunk frame in a rustic cabin or tent.



You would be wrong, I am afraid.

Paco Zoom