Mammut Rappel Kit

Ultralight, compact, and convenient.

This Rappel Kit consists of Mammut's ultralight gear for ski tourers, backcountry snowboarders, and alpinists. Mammut gave the 60m, 6.0mm Rappel Cord some stretch to make rappelling easier, and the Nano 8 Belay Device was designed to accommodate skinny ropes like this one. The Nano 8 adjusts speed and braking levels with the side handle, and the Wall Micro Oval Locking Carabiner's screwgate spins like an absolute dream. Mammut designed the included bag specifically for everything in this kit, making it as compact as possible.

  • 60m 6.0 Rappel Cord
  • Nano 8 Belay Device
  • Wall Micro Oval Screwgate Locking Carabiner
  • Rope Bag
  • Reviews
  • Q & A

Is this rope made of Nylon or Polyester??

Best Answer

After a bit of research seem to have answered my own question: this rope is made with either Technora or Twaron (as per answer below). From http://ropewiki.com/Rope_comparison - "Technora is an aramid fiber with a very high melting point, and therefore commonly used in fire rescue. In canyoneering, it is capable of withstanding the high amounts of heat generated by rope-on-rope sliding friction, which makes tools like the VT Prusik possible. Technora seems to absorb somewhat more water than polyester and Dyneema/Spectra, but not nearly as much as Nylon."

For low abrasion situations

    Rappelled on rope using sqwurel rappel device, worked fine on maximum friction setting. Also ascended on rope using frog system with pantin, no noticeable stretch. Very stiff rope, which I like. Did not try micro 8. Compact and light.

    Unanswered Question

    Is this ok to use for a single rope rappel?

    Bad information

      I dont know who writes these product descriptions but they need to be proof read.

      Stretch does not make rappelling easier. Mammuts own website mentions the LOW STRETCH properties of this rope.

      some stretch=low stretch, quit looking for things to complain about, bootboy!!

      No, low stretch means 0-1%. Some stretch is 1-5%, not enough to be dynamic, but meh.

      And he's right; stretch does not make rappelling easier.

      Can you qualify why it's a clear NO? Is it because it's nyon vs. polyester? Or is it because it's too thin/slippery for safely rappelling in canyons??

      Is this good for wet conditions?

      Hi Chris!

      Great Question!

      This rope-kit is designed mostly for Ski-Mountaineers who need to rappel through a cliff-band or want a compact system for "just-in-case" situations.

      What would your application be?

      Need more info/beta? Want help getting geared up for your next adventure? Feel free to reach out to me directly @ nreed@backcountry.com

      Is this rope technically rated as a 'dry rope'? As for application, one would be rappelling on wet slushy snow (sprint ski touring), meaning the rope gets totally wet. Another application would be canyoneering - using it as a pull cord along with a proper polyester 8.3 canyoneering rope. Thoughts?

      Will this work well for canyoneering? Looking for a nice superlight rope for rappelling wet (pacific north west granite) canyons.

      NO NO NO!



      its 6mm nylon cord and would be a great way to get yourself killed canyoneering. Get a real canyoneering rope.

      anyone know how this rope will hold up if it gets wet?

      At only 6mm, this cord is fragile as is. Water makes nylon stretchier and softer.

      What's the difference between this 6mm cord and say, Bluewater's 6mm accessory cord ?

      Best Answer

      Its almost double the strength. Bluewater's 6mm is 8.4 kN where this is 16 kN



      You can call or email me directly. 801-736-6398, or bporreca@backcountry.com

      For David Mathes and garp582263



      This is a highly specialized cord made to fill an empty niche of a lightweight packable solution for rappelling in a backcountry or alpine setting. Mammut's website states that this cord has a high aramid content, which means it is either Technora or Twaron. These are both heat-resistant and high-strength fibers, which are used for "PER", Personal Escape Ropes by firefighters. The "low-stretch" gives a very small cushion during an emergency egress. Additionally, Mammut states that no coating is used on this cord. Teijin, the manufacture of Technora and Twaron, states on their website that they use a "waterblocking treatment which eliminates the need for additional protection covers to prevent water ingress". In other words, it is an essentially "dry" cord.



      Mammut confirms that this 6.0mm "Rappel Cord is also distinguished by a low stretch that assists with rappelling", but only as in the example used above. That means it is not dynamic, but a STATIC cord and should NOT be used for belaying or fall protection.



      The breaking strength is indeed 16kN as stated by Bill Porreca. The "Tech Specs" above state that the "Impact Force" is 16kN. That is a typo; "Minimum Breaking Strength" is what was meant. A safe impact force can be considered to be 4kN or less. But an impact force of 16kN is certainly possible, and would cause severe injury or death. This is not a cord or rope that will safely catch a fall. But it is a great lightweight and compact package to descend quickly and safely by rappelling when using all rappel precautions.

      For David Mathes and garp582263

This is a highly specialized cord made to fill an empty niche of a lightweight packable solution for rappelling in a backcountry or alpine setting.  Mammut's website states that this cord has a high aramid content, which means it is either Technora or Twaron. These are both heat-resistant and high-strength fibers, which are used for "PER", Personal Escape Ropes by firefighters.  The "low-stretch" gives a very small cushion during an emergency egress.   Additionally, Mammut states that no coating is used on this cord. Teijin, the manufacture of Technora and Twaron, states on their website that they use a "waterblocking treatment which eliminates the need for additional protection covers to prevent water ingress".  In other words, it is an essentially "dry" cord.  

Mammut confirms that this 6.0mm "Rappel Cord is also distinguished by a low stretch that assists with rappelling", but only as in the example used above.  That means it is not dynamic, but a STATIC cord and should NOT be used for belaying or fall protection.

The breaking strength is indeed 16kN as stated by Bill Porreca. The "Tech Specs" above state that the "Impact Force" is 16kN. That is a typo; "Minimum Breaking Strength" is what was meant. A safe impact force can be considered to be 4kN or less. But an impact force of 16kN is certainly possible, and would cause severe injury or death. This is not a cord or rope that will safely catch a fall. But it is a great lightweight and compact package to descend quickly and safely by rappelling when using all rappel precautions.

      Size References

      This gives you an idea of the size of the rope diameter and rope bag when placed next to an average sized mannequin.

      Size References