Eureka Midori Solo Tent: 1-Person 3-Season

Lighten your trek, not your wallet.

Eureka has added a new member to the family of lightweight, highly affordable backpacking shelters: the Midori Solo Tent. The Midori Solo has inherited all the same sensibility that has already made the Midori 2 and 3 so popular with trekkers. This younger sibling offers a quick set-up; after a long day, it takes no more than ten minutes between grabbing the poles and curling up inside your two-pole dome shelter. With or without the rain fly, the Midori Solo breathes very well due to the mesh construction of the canopy, strategically placed hooded fly vents, and open bottom flaps. Weighing in at only three pounds nine ounces, it doesn't weigh down your daytime experience unnecessarily. Inside, the Midori Solo provides ample amount of room for a single person with an average amount of gear: when secured into place the rain fly creates a weatherproof vestibule, gear pockets, and a gear loft for additional on-hand storage or organization.

  • Two-pole dome structure
  • Polyester taffeta construction
  • Quick set up
  • Hooded fly ventilation
  • Three pounds, nine ounces
  • Vestibule
  • Gear pockets and loft
  • Reviews
  • Q & A

Great Value for a Quality Tent.

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I used this tent for about 5 years on backpacking and kayaking trips before I made an absent minded mistake and lost it (don't ask). During that time it held up remarkably well. The only functional wear I noticed was a small hole in the mesh and the included stuff-sack. The rain-fly, sides, and floor only incurred minor abrasions from regular use in calm and occasional moderately inclement weather without a footprint.

It assembles easily. Without the rain-fly I can set it up in less than five minutes; attaching it adds only another 3-4 minutes. Since I use it primarily for backpacking I usually fast-pitch it without stakes, which are decent quality, but fairly heavy.

It's simple but functional. A small gear-loft is included, but that's about it, which if fine with me since more elaborate tents are much more expensive. I've used it in light to moderate rain and wind several times and have never had any major issue with fly leakage or water otherwise getting inside. I don't know if the seams are 100% waterproof, but the fly coating makes it high hydrophobic, so water pretty much just bounces off without penetrating the seams much. With the rain-fly attached there is some condensation, but not all that much, and it the fly does provide some insulation, keeping the inside a few degrees warmer on cool nights. It's probably not well suited for high inclement weather, but is fine for calm to moderate conditions.

While heavier than more expensive tents, this issue can be minimized. As mentioned above, I usually don't bring the stakes for backpacking. If you know conditions will be dry you can also leave out the rain-fly, which probably drops the trail weight just below 3 pounds (just an unverified guess).

My only minor gripe is the small poles built into the front-base of the fly, which forms a small triangle. This design seems unnecessary and finicky. They could simplify the design by eliminating these and it would be just as functional while reducing the weight a bit.

There are a number of similarly designed two-pole tents on the market, but all others I'm familiar with are either more expensive and weigh about the same or noticeably heavier and comparably priced. This tent is highly functional at a reasonable weight and cost.

Unanswered Question

Why does the rain fly say Amari Pass Solo on it in all the pictures instead of Midori Solo?

Didn't last

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I used this tent less than 30 times when the ends of the poles started to crack. Two days later at least 1/2 of the pole segments were cracked and breaking. This tent does not come with repair pole sleeves so I had to dig one out from another tent to finish the trip. I expected more.

Is the footprint included or sold separately?

Best Answer

Hey Brandon - This tent does not come with a footprint. You can buy a small 'floor saver' from Eureka since they do not have a footprint specific to the Midori Solo. Feel free to contact me directly with any additional questions.

- Kyle L. - Expert Gearhead

Erueka Midori Solo

Surprisingly Robust Tent For The Price

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

Not the lightest tent but surprisingly heavy duty. Not as light as my vapor light or light year sierra designs one man tents, but this little guy is roomier, lasts better during down pour, and has survived battery better. Typically one man tents aren't the heaviest duty pieces of equipment I own, but my Midori is practically bulletproof. Would recommend to a friend looking for a decently one man tent.

I like this Tent.

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I really like the price point and packability of this tent. I just wish the ventilation was a tad bit better. Great tent over all though, it is my go to!

Midori One Tent

    They got this tent right. Solid in every category. I was hesitant about the color but it is great. The fly is a subdued grey. The bright green of the tent portion brightens up the interior. You need to get a good ground cloth and cut in to fit in the fly. This allows you to stretch out in a camp chair while you change clothes or are tent bound.