Castelli Tempesta Shoecovers

Wet roads ahead.

Castelli's Tempesta Shoe Covers make sure that keeping your feet warm and dry doesn't have to ruin your overall aesthetic. The Tempesta Shoe Covers protect your feet from rain, sleet, and snow with the streamlined design and functionality you'd expect from the Italian brand.

The shoe covers are the first to feature Castelli's new OutDry technology, which involves vacuum-bonding an OutDry membrane to a stretchy nylon shell to create a single impermeable-but-breathable layer. Castelli constructed the top zipper to be waterproof too, so once you put the covers on, your feet are completely sealed off from water coming from all directions.

When you're getting ready to ride, use the neoprene ankle cuffs to pull the shoe covers on quickly and easily — they fit close to the body to keep water out and keep them in place. Castelli recommends using the Tempestas with any type of cleat in temperatures ranging from 43 to 53 degrees.

  • Foul-weather shoe covers for the all-weather cyclist
  • Weather-resistant membrane keeps wind and rain at bay
  • Recommended for temperatures in the 40s
  • Reviews
  • Q & A

Good covers for a tough job

  • Fit: Runs small
  • Size Bought: Extra Large

Clearly I do not have the ideal Castelli physique. I wear their Large jerseys and bibs, Medium leg warmers, and Extra Large in these shoe covers. Others have said so. So I'm just bolstering the idea that these run small. I have Specialized S-Works road shoes in 45.5 Euro size. and I needed to go up to the X-Large.

The left cover's zipper ends comfortably but snug at the top. But I have to fight a little with the zipper to the right shoe cover to get it all the way home. The covers are snug around the ankles, as they should be. And with the Velcro (aka, hook and loop) fasteners under the arch, you can get the bottom part of the shoe to wrap well, leaving a minimum of surface area underneath exposed.

They do pretty well in light rain. I've come home a few times now in the wet, and my shoes have remained dry. Although I can't speak for all out downpours.

Not super insulators. But I don't believe they're designed for that. And adequate in that department, anyhow.

Shoe covers have a tough job. It's an odd shaped appendage to cover and keep dry adequately. I think these do an admirable job given the innate challenges.

Wet Feet and Blown Seam

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times
  • Fit: Runs small
  • Size Bought: Extra Large

Water beaded up from road spray which made me very excited. However, when it started raining, I came home with wet feet, socks, and shoes.

This is a low volume shape over the top of my foot, where my foot and ankle meets. This low volume causes the shoe cover to bind in this area eventually causing the stitching on the seam to separate.

It's a solid pair of overshoes

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
  • Fit: True to size
  • Size Bought: M

I used these overshoes in the past month to make sure I test them in various conditions. I purchased this especially for my 11-mile commute because I found velotoze to be too hard to get on twice a day.

Everybody should understand that in moderate rain you DO need full fenders to prevent water getting into your shoes. Also you have to tape the opening of the overshoes or pull a full leg warmer over it (I prefer leg warmers). If you use shoes with a lot of ventilation water gets in very easily, so pick something with a more closed design.

Fit: The M fits my 42 (9 US) giro empire slx perfectly. I don't think that the sizing is off at all. Your overshoes should be pretty snug anyway, but obviously if you have bulkier winter shoes, you might need to size up. For me, it's pretty easy to put on. They are not restrictive and comfortable. I also like the closure system.

Performance: I used this during my 11-mile commute several times and it works very well. They kept my feet dry so far. It's not too warm, but I think above 60 fahrenheit (16C) you would need something that has better ventilation. They kept me dry for 40 minutes in moderate rain and I think that's better than what you get from an average pair of overshoes.

Design: It looks good with reflective details. I'm not a huge fan of the castelli logo, but I guess that's subjective. It fits snuggly and the look is clean.

Quality: I had to fix the zipper when I got it because they were stitches over the zipper track. It was an easy fix with a pair of scissors, but still...

If you do not have fenders and/or looking for something completely waterproof for your longer rides, you might want to try velotoze (the long ones). They have their own downsides (hard to put on, zero ventilation and no insulation), but they are more waterproof than these.

Not waterproof in actual rain

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times
  • Fit: Runs small
  • Size Bought: XXL

I commute 55 miles round-trip in Seattle and these shoe covers do not work at all. After my ride I have enough water in my shoes that there is a visible pool that can be poured out. I wear Castelli nanoflex leg warmers and put them over the boot covers, but still get lots of water in my shoes (Sidi Breeze Rain shoes). To be fair, my bike does not have fenders (unfortunately no fender mounts on the frame or fork and the strap-on fenders didn't work out).

Make sure that you tape over all ventilation holes on your shoes. You should also tape over the cleat screw holes in your shoes.

For longer rides I'd recommend long velotoze, but be prepared that they are fragile, they have no ventilation and very hard to put on. For 27 miles in the rain it might be worth it.

And also you need full fenders in very wet conditions. There is no magic trick around that. You can only stay dry for limited time if you have water coming off your tires constantly.

You're probably getting a lot of water in your shoes from dripping down, and likely coming in from the drain hole at the bottom of your shoes. Use Tempesta shoe covers w/ Tempesta leg warmers over the ankles since they don't absorb water like NanoFlex will. Fenders would likely fix the latter issue. You can fit more robust fenders like the Planet Bike Cascadia fenders even w/o mounts on your frame using some common electrical fittings from the big box hardware stores. Go see the folks at Woodinville Bicycle.

For fenders I had good luck with the PDW Full Metal Fenders. It took 3 hours to fit them, but so far so good. They offer a cheaper plastic version that might be even easier to fit (due to more flexibility).

Thanks for the follow-up comments, much appreciated!

Fenders: my commuter (SantaCruz Stigmata) unfortunately has no fender mounts. I actually had a set of PDW fenders but had to sell them since there was no way to mount them. Tried the SKS strap-on fenders but had difficulty with larger tires, 38c in my case). My next commuter will certainly have mounts for fenders...

Shoes: I took the foot bed out of the Sidi Breeze shoes but they seem to be sealed already. I suppose I could put tape on the bottom of the shoe on the outside then screw the cleats in through the tape, but I wonder how long that would last before the tape tore off.

Leg Warmers: I feel discouraged by the high price and low effectiveness of the Castelli shoe covers, so not very excited about paying even more for the Tempesta leg warmers.

No shoe cover alone will keep your feet dry, even with full fenders, and even with full rain pants overlapping the top of the shoe covers. The bottoms of all shoe covers are open to fit over cleats, and water sprays UP from where the front wheel hits the ground, and soaks your shoes, socks, and feet FROM THE BOTTOM UP. The solution is simple: wear Gore-Tex socks over your normal socks, under the shoe covers, and with rain pants overlapping the whole shebang This makes your sock combo pretty thick, so it may be tough to fit the double sock layer inside. But if you can, your feet will stay warm and dry-ish for 3 hours in pouring rain. ("Dry-ish" because, of course, Gore-Tex is only somewhat breathable and you will sweat some, especially if your shoe cover is completely waterproof.)

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Waterproof AF

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times
  • Fit: Runs small
  • Size Bought: 2XL

These shoe covers do what they are supposed to, keep your feet dry. They definitely run small, I wear a 45.5 specialized shoe and the 2XL fit the bill. You have to work your way back from the toe making sure to utilize the stretch of the material to get them to fit well, but once they do they are great. I have not experienced any rubbing or uncomfortable spots in the covers while riding. I ride with my leg warmers over the shoe covers and it works great. I've ridden in the worst Oregon rainfall this winter and these are the only covers I have used that keep my feet dry and warm.

Waterproof AF

I commute 55 miles round-trip in Seattle and these shoe covers do not work at all. After my ride I have enough water in my shoes that there is a visible pool that can be poured out. I wear Castelli nanoflex leg warmers and put them over the boot covers, but still get lots of water in my shoes. Are you doing anything different?

Works as advertised, but extremely small

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
  • Fit: Runs small
  • Size Bought: XL

I have always run a large in everything Castelli and wanted some rain gear for the fall. I use a size 45 Sidi wire and these were tight, in an XL. If you run a bigger shoe, you may not be able to get these to work. They are warm, and when used with the Tempesta leg warmers, will keep your feet drive. But be forewarned, I was close to stretching the zipper and have thought of returning them just because they are so tight, I've thought that I'd bust them.

Yes, everyone, remember to size up +1 or even +2 with Castelli shoe covers.

I also wear a 45 in Sidi. I have purchased Castelli shoecovers in both XL and XXL. The XLs (the recommended size) run very snug. I like the fit if the XXL more. The XXLs are still snug, effective, and good looking. Hope this sizing info helps.